Restoration Initiatives

Caloosahatchee Basin

Caloosahatchee Basin Management Action Plan

The Caloosahatchee Estuary Basin is the 277,408-acre watershed draining into the tidal portion of the Caloosahatchee system, currently excluding the upstream watersheds that contribute flows to the estuary above S79 (Franklin Lock). DEP identified the Caloosahatchee Estuary as not meeting water quality standards for nutrients. The Caloosahatchee Estuary BMAP was adopted in November 2012 to implement the nitrogen (TN) TMDL.

Governor DeSantis’ Executive Order 19-12 calls for the department to update restoration plans impacting South Florida, focusing on Lake Okeechobee and the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Estuaries. The department has completed the statutorily required five-year review of the Caloosahatchee BMAP and will be developing comprehensive strategies to protect and restore the river and estuary by end of January 2020. The department will continue to engage with stakeholders to identify protective programs and projects that will improve water quality. 
 
Thinking about swimming, fishing or boating? Check Caloosahatchee water quality status.

Caloosahatchee Estuary BMAP  Caloosahatchee Story Map

Okeechobee

Okeechobee Basin Management Action Plan

Lake Okeechobee, the largest lake in the southeastern United States, is a shallow, eutrophic lake with an average depth of 9 feet. The Lake Okeechobee Watershed covers more than 2.9 million acres and consists of nine sub-watersheds. DEP identified Lake Okeechobee as not meeting water quality standards for nutrients. The Lake Okeechobee BMAP was adopted in December 2014 to implement the phosphorus (TP) TMDL.

Governor DeSantis’ Executive Order 19-12 calls for the department to update restoration plans impacting South Florida, focusing on Lake Okeechobee and the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Estuaries. The statutory milestones for implementation and water quality improvement, and the associated water quality monitoring component, will be included in the five-year review for the Lake Okeechobee BMAP, due to the Legislature and Governor in December 2019, and will be adopted into the next revision of the BMAP no later than January 2020. The department will continue to engage with stakeholders to identify protective programs and projects that will improve water quality. 

Thinking about swimming, fishing or boating? Check Okeechobee water quality status.

Okeechobee BMAP    Okeechobee Story Map

St. Lucie River

St. Lucie Basin Management Action Plan

The St. Lucie River and Estuary Basin is a 514,649-acre watershed located in southeast Florida in Martin County, St. Lucie County, and Okeechobee County. It drains into the St. Lucie Estuary, a major tributary of the Southern Indian River Lagoon.  DEP identified the St. Lucie River and Estuary as not meeting water quality standards for nutrients (TN & TP) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). The St. Lucie River and Estuary BMAP was adopted in June 2013 to implement the nutrient TMDLs.

Governor DeSantis’ Executive Order 19-12 calls for the department to update restoration plans impacting South Florida, focusing on Lake Okeechobee and the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie Estuaries. The department has completed the statutorily required five-year review of the St. Lucie BMAP and will be developing comprehensive strategies to protect and restore the river and estuary by end of January 2020. The department will continue to engage with stakeholders to identify protective programs and projects that will improve water quality.

Thinking about swimming, fishing or boating? Check St. Lucie water quality status.

St. Lucie BMAP   St. Lucie Story Map

Statewide Annual Report on Water Quality and Quantity

Statewide Annual Report on Water Quality and Quantity

The Florida Department of Environmental Protection is committed to protecting Florida’s water resources, which are vital to Florida’s environment, economy and communities. The department works collaboratively with the Governor and Legislature, Florida’s water management districts, our partner state agencies, local governments, the public and other stakeholders to implement projects and programs to protect and restore our state’s iconic water resources.

The department has prepared its annual report detailing the status of many of these key programs, including total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), basin management action plans (BMAPs), minimum flows and minimum water levels (MFLs), and recovery or prevention strategies.
 
This year's annual report is available via this interactive webpage, which presents statewide summaries for TMDLs, BMAPs and MFLs—all of which are displayed alongside explanations of these programs, providing additional clarity and context. Users can easily explore specific waterbodies, geographic areas, individual stakeholders or projects of interest. A

ll project data—or selected and filtered subsets of project data—are available for download from within the application.

Interactive Statewide Annual Report